Judy Haslee Scott

Lincoln Hills Colorado Quilt

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I come from a long line of sewing family members.  Grandma made flannel baby clothes, Mom made dresses for me as a young girl, and Dad could sew a mighty fine custom seat cushion for your truck on his industrial machine he kept in the garage.  Surprisingly none of them ever made quilts.  For most of my life I made clothing for me, my children, my grandchildren, and tons of costumes for church plays.  The Addictive Quilting Fever (AQF) began to kick in about 15 years ago when I joined the Charitable Quilting group at my church taught by Shirley Wegert, a close family friend and professional quilter for Quilter’s Newsletter.
Learning to quilt wasn't an immediate high fever kind of process and I admit that I whined about the difficulty of the tasks for quite some time before discovering the upbeat accomplishments to be enjoyed.  Until the time of my retirement in 2004 I kept pace with the group activities and made a few simple quilts for family and friends.  What ultimately changed my quilting song from a low key clumsy tune into a beautiful alto harmony was the discovery of the wonderful world of modern sewing, embroidery machines and the fabulous world of long arm quilting on my HQ Sixteen.  
I proceeded cautiously on purchasing my new embroidery machine and then my HQ Sixteen long arm machine.  By that I mean that I asked my mentor Shirley about what she had and liked, and then went quickly to that booth at a local sewing convention and bought the perfect embroidery machine on some kind of sale (I’m pretty sure).  When she bought a desktop HQ Sixteen and loved all the room to maneuver the quilts, I went immediately to our local HQ store in Colorado called Make It Sew, and started making a plan.
At this point I was having some difficulty with uncooperative hands and feet as well as strength.  I had a small sewing room with custom tables and cabinets that would need to be modified.  Make It Sew was selling an older demo table that wouldn't fit in my sewing room so I convinced a very handy builder friend of mine (Bob W) that it could work If we carefully chopped the center section of the table in half and modified it to allow the table to fit across the room without need to back into the closet to get to the other side.  In a relatively short time, the remodeled furniture, the shortened table, new lighting, and a bright blue wall were in place and Bob Juenemann, owner of Make It Sew, had created a working magical shop where I could begin my long-arm adventure.
After lessons from Cheryl Holliday at Make It Sew and a few practice charity quilts, I began a 2.5 year journey of creating a fully custom history quilt that depicted my husband’s family history in Lincoln Hills, Gilpin County, Colorado.  I used every new technique that I learned at the Houston International Quilt Festival in 2008, techniques from my local water color classes, computer graphics techniques from Adobe CS3, and my own unique techniques and ideas to create a quilt that was appraised at about $5,000 and was received with interest and joy by people who knew the stories or were interested in quilts.  This quilt is titled Lincoln Hills Colorado: An African American Heartbeat and it has hung in the Colorado 2011 State Capitol Quilt show all summer. I could not have completed this project without my HQ Sixteen and the encouragement of family and friends.  Now I lay awake nights and plan for my next custom quilt adventure which could begin any morning now!

I own the following HQ machine: HQ Sixteen

Vicky Byars

A Happy Quilter

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For several years, my friend and I were mid-arm “wanna be’s” and would longingly look at all the mid-arm quilting machines at the AQS shows in Paducah and Nashville. We would fondle and play with all the different brands. We always looked at the Handi-Quilter because they are good machines and not over the top expensive. Our local HQ dealer would always tell me when they were on sale because she knew I wanted one. One day she called and gave me a deal I couldn’t refuse. So, I became the proud owner of an HQ Sixteen. What a thrill to finally have it in my home, waiting to be used to quilt my “resting” quilt tops. I was sailing along, happily quilting many tops when tragedy struck! But the rest of the story is better told by my dear HQ. “I was so happy. I had a nice place to live and a very nice owner who spent a lot of time with me. I was next to a nice big window , so I could look out and see the clouds drifting by and birds flying around. Then one day, huge, dark clouds came into view, bringing with them lots of rain, thunder, and lightning. I was beginning to get a little frightened when all of a sudden there was a loud boom, and I felt different. When all the thunder and rain was gone, my owner came to quilt. (She was in the middle of quilting a large quilt.) But when she turned me on that mean old “motor stall” took over. A few days later, I was on my way to the HQ doctor. I was gone for a long time, because I had to have several parts replaced. Thanks to the expert HQ physician, I was good as new and got to go home next to my window. My owner had really missed me, so we were both glad to be together again.” After waiting so long for my HQ Sixteen, I appreciated it even more. It made me realize just how much I had come to depend on it to get my quilt tops finished. I look forward to using my HQ every chance I get.

I own the following HQ machine: HQ Sixteen

Lynn Cartwright

Lynn with her first HQ Sixteen with HQ Pro-Stitcher quilt

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I learned to sew in high school. That was the only class that I made straight A’s in. Since then I made quite a bit of my own clothes then when kids came along I hand smocked all my daughters dresses then when they said no more (in 5th grade) I started quilting. I had done two queen size quilts and several small ones on the regular sewing machine by stitching in the ditch but I just wanted more. My first computer program for quilting was another brand with the Juki sewing machine. Not much throat space there! Then in 2009 I decided I needed a bigger machine. My sister-in-law had an HQ Sixteen with that same other computer program and she told me about the HQ Pro-Stitcher. I never looked at another long arm. My sister- in-law loved hers so much that I trust her and here I am with my own. Why did I buy the HandiQuilter 16 with the Pro-Stitcher? Because it’s the best there is. This program is the easiest to use. The ability to actually place your designs where you want them is wonderful. I am not artistic at all but with the Pro-Stitcher I feel like as artist. I really sit down and plan out my quilt designs so that they compliment the fabrics and patterns in my quilts. People ask me all the time if I quilt for others or do custom work and I don’t, but I take this as the highest compliment you can receive. Even better my husband always makes sure that I have time to sew. We work together and do everything ourselves so my time is his quite a bit. I just love sewing and quilting. I started working with 4H in our community and I hope to get some of the kids hooked on quilting. You can’t go wrong with any of the Handi Quilter products. The training, service and support are top notch. If I had to get another long arm it would be an upgrade to the HQ18 Avante or the HQ24 Fusion, whichever fits best in my sewing room, which is in my living room. I also love the DVD’s, so helpful when you need a reminder or to learn something new.

I own the following HQ machines: HQ Pro-Stitcher, HQ Sixteen

Sharyn Drollinger

Soo cool

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Created lots of tops while taking care of my father-in-law but didn't have time to quilt. When he passed away i needed to get ahead of the game so decided to get a long arm. In the month since standing I have quilted 25 quilts now just need to bind. My grandson is fasinated with the machine if only he was tall enough to work independently. I was determined to find somewhere to set up the machine even if it meant giving up our living room

I own the following HQ machine: HQ Sixteen

Heide Mulberger

It barely fits in my room, but I make it work!

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I am not supposed to be here. Three years ago I had a very sudden illness, and almost died. I spent a year and two months at my brother's home in Texas, seeing a specialist while I was recovering. Quilting was my mental rehabilitation, making tops and keeping my hands busy. I spent many hours in bed, appliqueing, reading magazines and books and surfing the web learning lots of new techniques. While doing this, I completed a pile of quilt tops, but my body was too weak to quilt them all. Manhandling the layers through my regular machine was not an option. So, I kept on piecing tops and hoping that someday I would become strong enough to once again wrangle the fabric. The quilt shop I was going to in Texas had a longarm machine, and after watching them use it, I thought that would be a great way to finish my quilts! I looked at several longarm machines, and always walked away because I just couldn't afford one,especially with all the medical bills that had piled up while I was sick. Then about a year and a half ago my mom passed away. All my life she always encouraged me to make my own way, and to be creative. After much debate and with my family's encouragement, I decided to spend my "inheritance" on a Handi Quilter. I haven't looked back since! I have finished a large number of quilts that I have donated to various charities (particularly Quilts of Valor). Now I am dreaming of starting my own longarm business. I guess you could say that my quilting has been my lifeline! I have named my machine "Nessie"... the quilting monster!

I own the following HQ machine: HQ Sixteen