Joe Filer

I'm using a pantograph on a charity quilt

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I ordered a HQ24 Fusion at the Paducah quilt show in April of 2009 after comparing it with the competition. I have surpassed 500 quilts since I began logging my work in September, 2009. Most of my work has been dedicated our favorite charities: Project Linus, Quilts of Valor, and several local shelters. I have been especially pleased working with the HQ technical staff to improve the functionality and “personalization” of my machine. I have found that long arm quilting is a great challenge for a man, calling upon my background mechanical and mathematical experiences. The HQ technicians have been very helpful with my general questions and installation of software updates. They even invited me to beta test an update. I am hopeful that my input for product improvement and innovations is helpful and not viewed as too “kooky”. I love to tinker with my setup, looking ways to make my quilting easier and nicer. I really like the ability to using specialty threads that local quilters with other brands of machines don’t want to touch! Metallic threads have worked well on art quilts and glow-in–the-dark thread adds an exciting touch to the Project Linus kid quilts. I have been expanding my experience into denser custom quilting (picture), ruler work with monofilament thread, and trapunto with water soluble thread. Successful use of my Fusion encouraged me to try my hand at piecing my own top. During a short period when my Fusion was in for routine service, my wife gave me instruction to piece a “Sudoku” quilt of my own design. I finished it on the Fusion with a “puzzle” pantograph quilting pattern. It is a functional puzzle quilt that can be placed on the floor and solved with quilted playing pieces. It has been enjoyed by our children, grand children and even our dog. (picture) I’m looking forward to future projects that will include hand painted fabric with whole cloth quilting motifs. Long arm quilting need never get boring!

I own the following HQ machine: HQ24 Fusion

Carol Marshall

Carol, Pete and Idgie

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The road to quilting started for me in the autumn 2007 when I joined a group of ladies on a "Quilt for a day for Cancer". I immediately fell in love with the whole idea of quilting not realizing it was going to be our retirement hobby. In December 2007 Pete (my husband) and I took an introductory class to Quilting. March 2008 we signed up for a Beginners class at the local quilt shop. From that day forward we never looked back. More classes at the local quilt shop - log cabin, yellow brick road and turning twenty etc. Then as luck would have it the local quilt shop had a long arm to rent. I immediately signed up for a class. With loads of encouragement from Pete we were at the start of our journey to owning our own longarm.
Summer 2010 the looking began. We live in the small village of Manotick just south of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. We checked out some longarm quilting machines locally, non HQ. The HQ website gave us an address for the closest dealer to us which was in Fonthill, Ontario. So we made the trip there, over 500kms away, for a morning demo on a HQ18 Avante. August 2010 saw us take the trip to Manchester, New Hampshire to visit the Quilt Show there. Our first day there we tried some of the longarm machines on display. The second day we kept returning to the HQ display. We felt the HQ was easy to operate, produced better stitching than the others and was appealing to the eye. To make a long story short we drove back home and ordered a HQ24 Fusion from Kelly at The Quilting Bee in Fonthill. It was delivered in the fall of 2010 and assembled by Pete. We find it awesome and have been enjoying it ever since.
In July this year we took another trip to Fonthill and picked up our Pro Stitcher. It was installed by Pete and we are currently in the midst of learning how the software works. We are looking forward to loads of fun piecing and quilting in the years to come on "Idgie".

I own the following HQ machines: HQ24 Fusion, HQ Pro-Stitcher

Sue Fors


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Sue Fors! My HQ Story My story starts in 1998, when my husband had his stroke. I needed to pick up a ‘hobby’ to keep myself not only busy, but close to home. A friend was taking some quilting classes, and shared her new found passion with me. My first quilt was a king size Star of Bethlehem! YOWSER! Did I get bitten by that quilt bug, or what! I had my first granddaughter in November of 1998 and the second one in March of 1999. That gave me two more twin size log cabin quilts to make, and I haven’t stopped since. I love giving the gift of a hand-made (by me) quilt to others. But, my biggest issue was pushing and pulling, tugging and stretching those big quilts inside my old machine that had only a 5” throat! We’ll now fast-forward to 2004, when I bought my first ‘long-arm’. It was a tabletop frame, and the machine had a 9” throat. As big as it was, I knew that wasn’t going to work. So, in 2005, I bought the best I could afford; a frame with a machine that was stretched to a 17” throat. I battled through the tension issues, skipped stitches and thread breaks. I really thought this was all part of the quilting process. Last Spring, my dealer talked to me about the HQ18 Avante’. When I went in to ‘play’ on it, I noticed the HQ24 Fusion. It felt awesome! But, what really convinced me to make this purchase (apart from the excitement), was the service and support that my dealer offers. They are only a phone call away, and have an HQ Support Group every month. We get to show-n-tell, troubleshoot our issues, and there is always an informative lesson planned. I have loved owning this machine during the last year so much; that this year I added the ProStitcher. Having the Handi Quilter has not only made my quilting easier, but it has made me a better quilter!

I own the following HQ machine: HQ24 Fusion

Pam Barman

Pam Barman, Houston, TX

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I began my adventures in quilting in 2009 when my best friends coaxed me into taking a class with them. After a few too many times of rolling and stuffing a queen size quilt into my little domestic machine, and stitching in the ditch, I knew I wanted a long-arm machine. My mother had taught me to sew clothing when I was very young, but I had stopped sewing as an adult. Mom had passed on before I started quilting, but I always feel like she is smiling down on me from heaven when I'm sewing now! And since she had left me a little inheritance...well, I just knew Mom would want me to have a long-arm!! My HQ18 Avante is the perfect machine for me; it is so user friendly, and makes me feel like I am in control of my quilt from start to finish. I love being able to not only quilt my own creations, but having my HandiQuilter also allows me to quilt charity and Quilt of Valor quilts for my guild. I've just donated a quilt to a foundation, to be raffled at a fundraiser. Being able to participate in these types of projects is very fulfilling and I know it wouldn't be possible without my Handi Quilter! So, thanks HQ for making my life so much sweeter!

I own the following HQ machine: HQ18 Avante

Carolyn Kerpchar


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My HQ Sweet Sixteen story begins with a Friendship Quilt made for my maternal grandmother back in the mid-1930's.  I came by that old quilt when the family gathered after Mother's death to settle her estate.  As I now recall, china, silver, paintings, furniture and all manner of items were requested and distributed among the family members but when it came time for the quilt there were no takers.  Up to that time I had never quilted and never even thought of quilting.  But as I ran my hands over that quilt and read the names of those who made each block I began to realize that here was a story with a touch of love and admiration for one woman written with needles and thread on pieces of soft cotton cloth by her daughters, nieces and friends.  I asked and the quilt was mine.
Grandmother's Friendship Quilt graced the bed in our guest room for several years where I also kept my modest little sewing machine.  The more I saw and touched that quilt the more I thought I would love to do one myself but the task seemed overwhelming.  "Where would I even start?"  Well, I started by getting a few popular quilting magazines.  As I read through the articles the process seemed simple enough but the quilting machines looked to be outside my budget.  I set aside the idea of quilting and instead became interested in machine embroidery.  Over time I became quite good at embroidery and even did small projects for friends and clubs. My husband laughingly will say he helped with these projects as he has T-shirts and the seat in pairs of underwear with someone else's initials or club logo on them.  True, but that's another story.
One day I received a call asking if I would consider embroidering a large number of patches for a local club.  If I accepted the job, I knew that my current machine would not be up to the challenge so I began to look at other machines.  Thumbing through magazines and searching the web for a new embroidery machine I came across my old loves, those quilting machines.  That feeling I originally had when first I touched Grandmother's Friendship Quilt came back to me.  For the next several days the thought of making a quilt myself kept coming back like a song you just can't get out of your mind.  I turned down the request to make those club patches and focused on making a quilt.
Wiser and more confident after several years of machine embroidery, I eagerly jumped into researching what I needed to begin making quilts.  My husband was elated when I told him I would not be practicing on his T-shirts.  Early projects included table runners and baby quilts that I could handle with my embroidery machine but when I tackled that first full bed quilt I learned the potential value of a dedicated quilting machine.  I asked my husband to be a sounding-board while I read aloud the specifications and cost for various quilting machines.  After going through the list he wrote something down on a piece of paper and then asked me what I thought was the best overall value, I replied that it was the HQ Sweet Sixteen.  He gave me the piece of paper and on it was written, "HQ Sweet Sixteen."  That was about six months ago and my HQ Sweet Sixteen and I are on our fourth quilt.  And into each goes a little love, just like with Grandmother's Friendship Quilt.

I own the following HQ machine: HQ Sweet Sixteen