Sharyn Drollinger

Soo cool

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Created lots of tops while taking care of my father-in-law but didn't have time to quilt. When he passed away i needed to get ahead of the game so decided to get a long arm. In the month since standing I have quilted 25 quilts now just need to bind. My grandson is fasinated with the machine if only he was tall enough to work independently. I was determined to find somewhere to set up the machine even if it meant giving up our living room

I own the following HQ machine: HQ Sixteen

Glenda Roth


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My story about my Hand iQuilter. In the year 2003, my mother invited me to join her to be her guest at her monthly quilt guild meeting. I found everyone’s “show and tells” so beautiful. And they were having so much fun! I never realized that my mother had been quilting for years creating so many beautiful quilts.
As soon as I could went to the quilt shop in Aberdeen, SD and found that they were giving quilting classes. I had sewn clothing since I was a young girl, took Home Economics in high school, so surely I wouldn’t be considered a beginner! So I signed up for not one but two classes, neither one of them for beginners.
I purchased my fabric and drove 50 miles each way to the classes two days a week. Soon I realized that I didn’t know that a ¼” seam is used for sewing quilts unlike 5/8“ seams in clothing! I also didn’t know what chain piecing was, or a fat quarter, or squaring a block. But I continued with my “intermediate” classes with lots of ripping and managed to finished my quilts.
Before I knew it, I had several quilt tops so I decided the next step was to learn how to quilt them. I signed up for a beginners quilting class and learned how to sandwich the quilt, the trapunto technique, quilting in the ditch and how to meander. But, I soon realized that I didn’t like quilting my large quilt tops on my Pfaff sewing machine. I purchased a Handi Quilter portable frame and a Juki machine. I soon learned that there wasn’t enough space for quilting and that I had to roll my quilt top often and was still unable to quilt a 10” block.
I searched for a quilting machine that was both affordable and one that would give me more quilting space. I found the HQ Sixteen to be both affordable and gave me the needed quilting space so purchased it in July of 2004 and continued to use the portable frame. I later attended the “Quilting On the Waterfront” Quilt show in Duluth, MN and traded the portable frame for a heavier duty frame with the continuous track. Now I had the quilting machine I was looking for
I had been “piecing” quilt tops and had so many to quilts. I didn’t want to pay someone to quilt them and add more cost to my already rather expensive habit! Handi Quilter was the answer to my prayer. I also quilt some of my mother’s quilts and earn a little extra on the side!
I quilted “Star Explosion” using my HQ Sixteen. I created the quilting designs and quilted with ease. I love my HandiQuilter. I don’t know what I would have done without it. Thank you Handi Quilter for making a machine that is both affordable and fun to create with.
This is my story.
Glenda Roth

I own the following HQ machine: HQ Sixteen

Carol Marshall

Carol, Pete and Idgie

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The road to quilting started for me in the autumn 2007 when I joined a group of ladies on a "Quilt for a day for Cancer". I immediately fell in love with the whole idea of quilting not realizing it was going to be our retirement hobby. In December 2007 Pete (my husband) and I took an introductory class to Quilting. March 2008 we signed up for a Beginners class at the local quilt shop. From that day forward we never looked back. More classes at the local quilt shop - log cabin, yellow brick road and turning twenty etc. Then as luck would have it the local quilt shop had a long arm to rent. I immediately signed up for a class. With loads of encouragement from Pete we were at the start of our journey to owning our own longarm.
Summer 2010 the looking began. We live in the small village of Manotick just south of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. We checked out some longarm quilting machines locally, non HQ. The HQ website gave us an address for the closest dealer to us which was in Fonthill, Ontario. So we made the trip there, over 500kms away, for a morning demo on a HQ18 Avante. August 2010 saw us take the trip to Manchester, New Hampshire to visit the Quilt Show there. Our first day there we tried some of the longarm machines on display. The second day we kept returning to the HQ display. We felt the HQ was easy to operate, produced better stitching than the others and was appealing to the eye. To make a long story short we drove back home and ordered a HQ24 Fusion from Kelly at The Quilting Bee in Fonthill. It was delivered in the fall of 2010 and assembled by Pete. We find it awesome and have been enjoying it ever since.
In July this year we took another trip to Fonthill and picked up our Pro Stitcher. It was installed by Pete and we are currently in the midst of learning how the software works. We are looking forward to loads of fun piecing and quilting in the years to come on "Idgie".

I own the following HQ machines: HQ24 Fusion, HQ Pro-Stitcher

Beth Wills


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I have not, nor have I ever been able to take classes, travel to seminars or belong to neighborhood quilting clubs or quilds. I worked the night shift and had “days off” during the week. No one wanted to teach me to quilt or give a class at 3:00 AM when I was awake and sewing through my “day off”. So, I read magazines, books and more books. With the advent of the internet and YouTube, learning to quilt on your own would be a more manageable task. When I first started, I was all by myself – making lots of mistakes and making lots and lots of quilts for my family. Getting old is not for the faint of heart! Having old joints before your time is not so much fun either. As it became more painfully clear that crawling around on the floor to baste a quilt was no longer possible I started to look at alternative methods to “keep on quilting”. My first foray into frame quilting was with a popular wooden frame on which I put a great sewing machine with a “huge” 9 inch throat. I also at this time, introduced myself to computer assisted quilting. It didn’t take too long before I figured out that this gorgeous machine with the 9” throat was going to give me approximately 4” of quilting space once the finished quilt roll began to take up some of the space in the throat of that machine. I made a LOT of quilts with that particular set-up. I made lots and lots of those 4” passes of the machine, each and every pass wishing I had a machine with a larger throat. And, because I was having so much fun with the computer assisted end of frame quilting, I knew that I needed a larger machine that had computer guided capabilities. I spent hours dreaming about gorgeous feathers and other elegant edge to edge designs. I also dreamt about the possibility of a stitch regulator! When it became possible for me to start looking for this dream machine, I traveled across the state to try out various machines. I positively KNEW that I had found the machine for me when I got a chance to see a HQ Sixteen with a HQ Pro-Stitcher demonstrated. I was able to make the transition from my old set-up to the HQ Sixteen on a Professional Frame and QuilTable with ease. The ProStitcher, while different from the computer system I had used in the past, was not so different that many of the tasks felt almost intuitive. As per my past history, I have not attended any classes or seminars. I have just about every video that HQ has put out in an attempt to learn the machine. And, due to my recent history of having to spend months in a wheel chair recovering from some orthopedic surgery, I am reacquainting myself with my machine and HQ Pro-Stitcher. I am so happy to be able to be back on my feet, back at my frame and learning something new each and every time I finish a quilt. I love my HQ Sixteen with the HQ Pro-Stitcher!

I own the following HQ machines: HQ Pro-Stitcher, HQ Sixteen

Deena McAfee

Deena with her HQ18 Avante

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I have always been fascinated with quilts and quilting. Growing up I always wanted to make a quilt, but neither my mom nor grandmothers were quilters. When I was eight years old, my maternal grandmother came to live with my family a year after my grandfather passed away. My mom and grandmother sewed and made most of my and my sister’s clothes. My mom had a Singer treadle machine in which she and my grandmother sewed. I learned to sew using that machine. Oh what great memories of pumping the foot peddle. When I was in fifth grade, my grandmother got an electric sewing machine for Christmas. I loved to sew, and made craft things, like rag dolls, bears, rabbits and their clothes. I did not know the rules of sewing; I just knew how to sew on those machines. My grandmother is very talented and during my growing up years she was always crocheting or embroidering when she had free time. When I was in seminary, I asked my grandmother to teach me more about sewing and got a pattern to make an apron. I took it to her and she sewed most of it. When I said, I want to learn how, not for you to do it, she said, “You can learn when I'm dead and gone.” Well, this year she turned 96 and still crochets; thank God, I did not wait until she was gone to learn. I made my first quilt with my grandmother and mom. We hand appliquéd the pattern “Belle”. My grandmother and I then quilted it by hand borrowing someone’s quilt frame. We really did not know what we were doing. My grandmother knew how to hand quilt and taught me the basics, but we did not trace a pattern or know what was expected of our quilting. In 2003, my husband and I moved to San Francisco where my husband worked as Chief of Chaplain Services for the VA Medical Center. It was there; I started working with female veterans and wives of veterans. I told one of the women I was taking a quilting class and she encouraged me to learn to machine quilt. Learning to make quilts and machine quilting became my new passion. I started looking for long arm quilting machines on the Internet and I found Handi Quilter. I was so impressed with what I saw, I knew I wanted to own one. I started saving and would put $10.00 or $20.00 in my sock drawer when I had extra money. One of my dreams was to one day own a small retreat center. My husband wanted to have a place in the woods where veterans could come and get away from the stresses of their lives. I wanted a place where their wives or other women could come for quilting retreats. In 2007, my husband and I moved back to Virginia where we had purchased 75 acres of land and started remodeling “Birchleaf Center” for small retreats. I still had my long arm savings in my sock drawer, which was growing. In 2010, I went to the AQS quilt show in Knoxville and met Mark Hyland. I told him of my dreams for our retreat center and how I wanted women to come, make a quilt and finish it using a long arm machine. He showed me the HQ18 Avante and I fell in love with the machine. I went home vowing to save more money. My husband sold an old tractor he had and gave me the money for my sock drawer. I still did not have enough money. In October of that year, I was given a donation for the remaining amount from an individual who had attended a family retreat at Birchleaf Center. We now have this great machine at Birchleaf Center. The first week of August 2011, I had 9 women come for a retreat and we quilted 8 quilts on the HQ18 Avante, which will be donated to Virginia State Police to be given away in emergencies. We completed 10 out of 70 quilt tops to be donated to the Holston Home for Children in Greeneville, TN. I am so grateful for the HQ18 Avante. It has not only given me great pleasure in using it, but it is being used to help others.

I own the following HQ machine: HQ18 Avante